2 thoughts on “The Myth of Learning Styles?

  1. Alda

    I think there definitely could be something to the idea that we should focus on what motivates the students in a particular class, rather than trying to design activities that would work for every supposed learning style in every class. I’ve done mid-course evaluations and asked specifically about what activities students do/don’t like, and whether they feel the class is a good fit for their learning style. Upon honest reflection I’d say I do this because I totally bought into the hype about learning styles and thought it would look like I wasn’t a caring, conscientious professor if I wasn’t trying to cater to all different learning styles constantly. Well, the feedback I just got this semester, and it’s not the first time, is that it’s actually “too much” to have videos AND handouts AND a book AND skits AND a discussion board etc. The problem with having “something for everybody” is that the course can seem fragmented. So, I’d be really interested to see if designing activities for only two dimensions, like internal versus external motivation, could be more successful than trying to do things for six different learning styles.

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  2. Bob

    Amen. Call it into question. Technique base on desired outcomes — is good enough. In other words martial arts are better learned in practice rather than from books. Painting needs both visual and kinesthetic opportunities other wise it is a different disciple i.e. art history.

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