Reflections on Bob’s piece…

Bob’s work in the area  of professional demeanor  reminded me of this famous online copy of Nordstrom’s employee training manual. This is printed on one side of a 4 X 6 card and constitutes the entire HR Manual. The implications are interesting. The first is that we trust you. The second is that you are supported in an educative environment. It is empowering, at the same time that it places tremendous responsibility on the individual. Very interesting from the standpoint of rules regarding learning communities.

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Reed College has something they call “the code.” It covers all aspects of student life, such as behavior and academic honesty. Instructors mostly give take-home exams. Students don’t cheat as it would violate “the code”… The code is unwritten by design. Sometimes the  spirit of a guiding principle is more powerful than a legalized verbalization?

3 thoughts on “Reflections on Bob’s piece…

  1. Bob

    I like the seeming simplicity of this, “Use best judgement in all situations.” In truth that is enough to get us through life let alone our career.

    I am afraid we are far more verbose but I hope this is the message that our student employees come away with.

    Reply
  2. AnneMarie Mattacchione

    I like the idea of this one practical rule- except we would have to qualify “best judgment.” Who decides that? It is similar to me when we say “Do what is right.” Whose rights? Whose morals? What if mine differ from yours?

    Working with families for the last 33 years, I am all too familiar with differing parenting skills and how the lack of teaching affects children. Using your best judgment requires that you are taught best judgment. One example that comes up a lot in my field is how teachers use their best judgment in classrooms knowing not all teachers are steeped in the same pedagogical experience. One teacher may feel that rote learning is necessary and the best way to learn math, another may see that rote learning has little value regarding higher-order thinking, so he chooses to use teaching and learning strategies and activities that immerse children in the process of understanding math concepts.

    I also wonder how well the statement of “use your best judgment” holds up in court concerning an HR matter? Interesting.

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